Rudolph

Publishing

The intertubes are sluggish these past few days, and I can’t determine if it’s due to all the chatter in regards to events happening around the world or an early demonstration of the lack of net neutrality with my ISP. Lots of spinning wheels of various colors and patterns. Opportunities, I suppose, to get out of the chair once in a while. I bought a Fitbit the other day, and have been both intrigued and horrified by what this tiny little device is telling me about my daily activity (or lack thereof).

Rudolph! went to the printer on Friday. What should have been a simple project consumed most of June and July, and I’ve spent so many hours staring at in during the last two months that I’m blind to whether it is any good anymore. I guess we’ll find out in a few months. It’s been a long time coming, in many ways, and if the last year has provided me with anything, it’s been this opportunity to finally get Rudolph! out in front of the world. Over the next week or so, I need to figure out what to do with posters Dylan Todd did.

Oh, I haven’t shared those here yet, have I? Silly me. Here’s a couple.

donner_web

blitzen_web

rudolph_web

And there’s a few hours of updating websites to be done. That’s what happens when more content comes down the pipe. You need to keep making sure word gets out.

Listening to Gus Gus’s Mexico, Bonobo’s Ten Tigers, and Wolves in the Throne Room’s Celestite these days. Saw Guardians of the Galaxy and enjoyed it quite a bit, but it never wasn’t a comic book movie, which kept it from really elevating itself out of its origins. That’s not a bad thing, mind you, but it’s one of the things that the Iron Man films have done well, in my mind. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I’ll queue up for endless GotG sequels, but it would be nice if the antagonist was actually something more than a cardboard villain.

Clean Slate

Book Talk

I’m in the weird post-project stage. I’ve turned in Katabasis, which is the next volume in the Medieval Cycle of the Foreworld Saga, and the Foreworld SideQuests are ticking along without my direct involvement (read I’m not the one doing all the writing). The Skyhorse/Start asset acquisition of Night Shade Books has closed, which means the CODEX books and Earth Thirst will stay in print (yeah!), but I’m waiting for the dust to settle over there before we start talking about the next books in either of those series.

[Oh, yeah, NSB sold their assets. The pertinent details can be read at io9.com. If you wish to get a glimpse of how that sale went down, check out the related articles at io9. Given my personal relationship with the folks at Night Shade, I have no further comment about the deal.]

Over the weekend, I mailed off a pitch for a new project, and so I’m in wait mode there. Foreworld TV/movie negotiations continue at a pace that is near glacial (more waiting). I’m working on putting together a collection of short stories. Yes, I was surprised to find that I had more than 100,000 words worth of short stories that have published. They add up after awhile. I’ve got an interested publisher and we’re looking at doing something a little different with that release. Beyond that, I’m still mulling over how to make a print edition of The Potemkin Mosaic. That may be my first Kickstarter project.

Yeah, Kickstarter. After CLANG last summer, I became a bit of a Kickstarter junkie. It feeds my desire to be around creatives. It’s really fun to get updates from all these projects and to be a part (albeit a fly on the wall more often than not) of the process. I n fact, one of the ones that I hope will reach its goal is the Radio Free Albemuth theatrical release project. I’ve missed two opportunities to see this edition of Philip K. Dick’s book. Help me out, would you? I figure if it actually gets theatrical release, I might be able to get my act together enough to go.

Kicking And Screaming

Writing

I managed a whole 1000 words of new fiction today. I’ve been doing so much editing over the last six months that I’ve started to feel invisible, working as a silent partner with other writers. Today, working on some fresh stuff, I found it hard to remember my own voice. Well, the voice I needed for the content. It came back eventually, but man, those writing muscles do atrophy quickly. Need to keep up a proper regime, after all.

On the e-publishing front, I stumbled upon Jeff and Ann Vandermeer’s new e-book imprint, Cheeky Frawg. Slightly silly name aside, they seem to have nailed the basic fundamentals of the new publishing frontier: lots of content, new and reprinted work; ace design that is both arresting and simplistic–very necessary when your storefront is the web; and a certain amount of irreverence.

Check out their 2011 publishing schedule.

Trust the Vandermeers to be at the forefront of the new paradigm.

I’m watching the Swedish version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo tonight. The film makes it abundantly clear that Larsson’s novel has at least three major storylines running through it. The film ditches a couple of the interesting side-notes (Mikael’s relationship with Erika, the cover story of him writing a book about the Vangers) in an effort to streamline things, but the film still blows through a lot of the subtlety of the novel. It’s a film that will probably seem even more archly foreign if you haven’t read the books, as you will keep wondering what it is that you’re missing (at lot, as it turns out). It’ll be interesting to see how Steven Zaillian adapts the novel. He’s got an impressive track record, so I’m pretty confident he’ll reduce it to something watchable. Which isn’t to say that the Swedish version isn’t; having read the novel, the film makes sense. I’m not sure it would if I hadn’t.